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Archive Civic Polity Reformed Irenicism Steven Wedgeworth

Philip Schaff on the History of Torture

In the 4th Volume of his History of the Christian Church, Philip Schaff devotes a chapter to the discussion of torture. Professor Schaff is wholly opposed to the use of torture in order to extract information or obtain a confession of guilt, and it is clear that he believes the best of Christian thought is also […]

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Archive Civic Polity Corpus Iuris Civilis Natural Law Reformed Irenicism Ruben Alvarado

The Roman-legal Background of the Concept of Equity

Equity makes its appearance in theological and confessional treatments, as a way of understanding the place of Old Testament law in the New Testament era. It is invoked e.g. in the Westminster Confession of Faith as such an interpretive principle. A good treatment of the theological usage of equity can be consulted here, but, there […]

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Archive Civic Polity Corpus Iuris Civilis E.J. Hutchinson

Latin Terms for “Law”: Fas, Ius, and Lex

Fas, Ius, and Lex: Vergilian Prelude fas mihi Graiorum sacrata resolvere iura, fas odisse viros atque omnia ferre sub auras, si qua tegunt; teneor patriae nec legibus ullis. (Aeneid 2.157–59; emphases mine) This is justice, I am justified in dropping all allegiance to the Greeks– as I had cause to hate them; I may bring […]

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Archive Civic Polity Corpus Iuris Civilis E.J. Hutchinson

Interlude: Denis Godefroy

In keeping with one of TCI’s goals, namely, evangelical and Reformed retrieval and renewal of the past and its literature, I thought I’d write up a brief sketch of the Reformed jurist I mentioned in my previous post, Denis Godefroy (Dionysius Gothofredus). For the curious nonspecialist, among whose number I count myself, it’s more difficult […]

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Archive Civic Polity Nota Bene Steven Wedgeworth

Whose Politics Are “Byzantine”?

Writing for The Guardian, Peter Frankopan believes that contrary to unflattering representations,  the old Byzantine Empire might have much to teach the modern EU, whose politics are really “Byzantine” in the pejorative sense, and run by a caste of men without chests even more than Byzantium was administered by eunuchs lacking other integral parts. Pointing […]

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Archive Civic Polity Corpus Iuris Civilis E.J. Hutchinson

An Introduction to the Corpus Iuris Civilis

I propose in coming weeks to put forward a series of historico-archaeological posts on ideas of justice and of natural law in Roman jurisprudence by making use of sections of two parts of Justinian’s Corpus Iuris Civilis (“Body of Civil Law”): first, the Digest and, later, the Institutes. Most posts will consist of a short […]