Categories
Archive Authors Civic Polity E.J. Hutchinson Nota Bene Philosophy Reformed Irenicism

Hemmingsen on the End of Political Life

In his On the Law of Nature (from which I’ve quoted several times previously), Niels Hemmingsen identifies the end, or goal, of political life (not “politics” in the crass sense in which we use the term today, but in the sense of communal life together in a commonwealth). He finds that justice, harmony, and God […]

Categories
Archive Civic Polity E.J. Hutchinson Early Church Fathers Nota Bene The Two Kingdoms

Whose Augustine? Which Augustinianism?

In the comments to a recent post about arguments from silence, some important issues were raised, and I’d like to deal with some of them because they deserve consideration. “Augustinianism” and the City of God The first has to do with the legacy of “Augustinianism” in relation to disestablishmentarianism and the like. There is a […]

Categories
Andrew Fulford Archive Authors Civic Polity Philosophy Reformed Irenicism

Hauerwas on Lewis on Pacifism

C. S. Lewis has been the subject of many posts at TCI, and with good reason. He ranks with the best apologists of the 20th century, if not as the best. But he did not write only as an apologist, at least not if we conceive that term narrowly. He did not contend only for […]

Categories
Andrew Fulford Archive Authors Civic Polity Natural Law Nota Bene Philosophy

Lewis on the Pitfalls and Pathways of Moral Reasoning

In his well-known attempt to field the question of pacifism, the essay “Why I Am Not a Pacifist”, C.S. Lewis established some preliminary ground rules about moral reasoning applicable beyond his particular concerns. He begins by adverting toward an analysis of Reason in general. Lewis notes that this involves three elements: the facts reasoned about, […]

Categories
Archive Authors Civic Polity E.J. Hutchinson Natural Law Nota Bene

Reality and the Ballot-Box (2)

Below is the rest of the passage of Thomas Carlyle of which I recently quoted a part. The alternative to believing reality to be determinable by vote is to believe that its laws are already inscribed in nature as it is and cannot be altered by human whim or fancy. The fact that I am […]

Categories
Andrew Fulford Archive Early Church Fathers Nota Bene

Augustine and his Gang of Pirates

If any theologian in church history could truly be said to contain multitudes, it would be the great bishop of Hippo. But an anarcho-libertarian is probably not among the residents of Augustine’s mind. Or at least, so argues Elizabeth Stoker Bruenig: Both the state and property therefore have positive moral contributions to make to human […]

Categories
Archive Authors Civic Polity E.J. Hutchinson Natural Law Nota Bene

Reality and the Ballot-Box (1)

Peter is fond of saying that reality is not up for a vote. We don’t get to vote our way into determining the way things are, though the Zeitgeist is adamantly blowing in that direction. Reality is just there, whether we like it or not. Below is a particularly eloquent expression of this idea from Thomas […]

Categories
Archive Authors Civic Polity E.J. Hutchinson Natural Law Nota Bene

The Final Cause of Civil Government in Romans 13:3-4

“[F]or the present we’re stuck with the world as it is. And if they couldn’t agree on a way to make an act of war impossible, then it is better to have some provisions for coping with the consequences than to have no provisions.” “Yes and no. Yes, if it’s in anticipation of one’s own. And especially no […]

Categories
Andrew Fulford Archive Civic Polity

Ellul’s Anarchism

ARTHUR: The Lady of the Lake, her arm clad in the purest shimmering samite, held aloft Excalibur from the bosom of the water signifying by Divine Providence that I, Arthur, was to carry Excalibur. That is why I am your king! DENNIS: Listen. Strange women lying in ponds, distributing swords, is no basis for a […]

Categories
Andrew Fulford Archive Authors Nota Bene

Tyrants and Two Kingdoms

The famous Huguenot tract Vindiciae, Contra Tyrannos attempts to delineate the proper rules regulating the behaviour of rulers and subjects. At one point in its argument it discusses the matter of “the two kingdoms” (the term does not appear at this point in the document, but the idea is clearly recognizable): Lest they should slip […]