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Archive E.J. Hutchinson Nota Bene Reformed Irenicism

“The Lord of Glory”

Herewith another Christmas poem by another American Presbyterian: this time a man named Louis F. Benson (1855-1930), whose memory has mostly faded away. Benson was a Philadelphian who went to Penn, then was a lawyer, then a Presbyterian minister in Germantown, PA, and then a writer, as well as an editor at the Presbyterian Board […]

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Archive Authors E.J. Hutchinson Early Church Fathers Nota Bene

Intende, qui regis Israel: A Hymn of Ambrose (3)

On to the next verse of the Advent/Christmas hymn Intende, qui regis Israel. Text and Translation Veni, redemptor gentium, ostende partum virginis, miretur omne saeculum, talis decet partus Deo. Come, redeemer of the nations, show forth the virgin’s parturition; let all the world stand in awe: such a birth is fit for God. Remarks Walpole notes that the […]

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Archive Authors E.J. Hutchinson Early Church Fathers Nota Bene

Intende, qui regis Israel: A Hymn of Ambrose (2)

Two days ago, I made some introductory remarks about the famous hymn of Ambrose known to many speakers of English as “Savior of the Nations, Come,” and focused specifically on its authenticity and ancient witness. Today we will look at the first stanza of the hymn, which is omitted from our modern version. This, then, […]

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Archive Authors E.J. Hutchinson Early Church Fathers Nota Bene

Intende, qui regis Israel: A Hymn of Ambrose (1)

Over the past few years I’ve posted Latin Advent and Christmas hymns with English translation and some comments. This year we’re going to look at Ambrose’s hymn Intende, qui regis Israel. Parts of this hymn are familiar in English as “Savior of the Nations, Come,” which my family has recently been learning along with some (other) […]

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Archive Authors E.J. Hutchinson Early Church Fathers Nota Bene

Hymn for Christmas-Day

Many people are at least passingly familiar with the late fourth century/early fifth century Christian Latin poet Prudentius because of John Mason Neale and Henry Baker’s translation of nine verses from Cathemerinon 9, the Hymnus omnis horae (“Hymn for Every Hour”), titled “Of the Father’s Love Begotten.” (Kevin DeYoung recently wrote about it here.) The Cathemerinon (“Daily Round”) is a […]

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Archive Authors E.J. Hutchinson Early Church Fathers Nota Bene Reformed Irenicism

“Behold, A Clear Voice Thunders”

Last year around this time I posted translations of some medieval Latin Advent hymns. So, in that spirit, here is another, which continues the practice of reminding its singers of both the First and Second Coming. The imagery of light is prominent throughout the poem, from the first line to the last stanza (“I, Jesus, have sent […]

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Africa Archive Authors E.J. Hutchinson Nota Bene Reformed Irenicism

Thomas Nods?

Last month, I posted a translation of a medieval Advent hymn, Verbum supernum prodiens. Its first stanza is closely alluded to in the first stanza of a eucharistic hymn of Thomas Aquinas. VERBUM supernum prodiens,               Supernal Word proceeding, nec Patris linquens dexteram,            yet not leaving the […]

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Archive Authors E.J. Hutchinson Nota Bene Reformed Irenicism

Veni, Veni (6)

Last year around this time I started a short series on the Latin hymn (comprising a series of antiphons) Veni, Veni Emmanuel, but didn’t get around to finishing it, so I intend to do that this year. We had gotten through v. 5 previously (which you can find here, along with links to the other four). […]

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Archive E.J. Hutchinson Reformed Irenicism

Christ, Savior and Judge of the “Secular”

Gasp! It is well known that the Latin term saeculum, whence our “secular,” etc., has a variety of meanings. Roughly the Latin equivalent of the Greek term αἰών, it sometimes means this passing “age,” in contrast to the age to come; sometimes “age” in a generic sense; sometimes “world.” There is nothing in the word’s […]