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Archive Reformed Irenicism Sacred Doctrine Steven Wedgeworth

The Tale of John Chrysostom’s Letter to Caesarius: Eucharist, Dogma, Textual Criticism, and Propaganda

Around the year 1548, Peter Martyr Vermigli published the following quote from John Chrysostom, said to be from a letter to Caesarius the monk: For as [in the eucharist] before the bread is consecrated, we call it bread, but when the grace of God by the Spirit has consecrated it, it is no longer called […]

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Jordan Ballor Nota Bene

Berman on Historical Fallacies

Here is an insightful section from Harold Berman outlining the ways in which historical frameworks (e.g. ancient, medieval, modern) can obscure rather than clarify: In addition to nationalist fallacies, legal historiography has suffered also from religious fallacies, both Protestant and Roman Catholic, which have obscured the continuity between the Catholic Middle Ages and post-Reformation modern […]

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Archive Reformed Irenicism Steven Wedgeworth

Getting Over “Fall” Narratives

So back in February, Peter Leithart responded to my response on his essay on Protestants and writing. I meant to respond again, but never did. It’s probably good though, because the conversation needs to be bigger than just any one article– and certainly bigger than personalities. I really did think his original essay shined a […]

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Archive Reformed Irenicism Steven Wedgeworth

The Bare Symbolism of the Late-Modern Longing: A Rejoinder to Peter Leithart

Do Amish Romance novels find their origin in the Swiss Reformation? You may never have considered this question before, but it really is only fair to ask it. Martin Luther and John Calvin are regularly blamed for the enormities of the modern world. Why let Ulrich Zwingli off the hook? Well, alright, it might be […]

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Archive Philosophy W. Bradford Littlejohn

The Follies of Contraceptive Historiography

Here at The Calvinist International, we care deeply about history, and yet we frequently trample freely on the shibboleths of contemporary historiography.  One of these is its commitment to truth-neutrality. In this it mimics, but goes even further than, the procedural liberalism that dominates the modern administration of justice, which abandons any concern for the […]

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Archive Jordan Ballor Nota Bene

Fischer on ‘the era of neo-Calvinism’

David Hackett Fischer, The Great Wave: Price Revolutions and the Rhythm of History (New York: Oxford University Press, 1996), 101: In theology this was the era of neo-Calvinism–the narrowest, darkest, bleakest, and most pessimistic form of Christianity that has ever been invented, more so even than the theology of Calvin himself…. In a later and […]