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Archive Nota Bene Steven Wedgeworth The Natural Family

What to think of “Heterosexuality”

Last week Michael Hannon posted an essay at First Things arguing against the idea of sexual orientation and the nomenclature of “heterosexuality.” It quickly became a big hit, so popular, in fact, that it warranted a (very poor) response from Slate.com. There was certainly an important truth to Mr. Hannon’s essay: the language of “orientation” […]

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Archive Nota Bene Steven Wedgeworth

Remi Brague and Secularism

Remi Brague is a first-rate scholar on the history of law, politics, philosophy, and religion. He recently wrote an article for First Things on the history and future of secularism. A (free) summary of that essay is available here. While we have a few points of disagreement with Dr. Brague, he is nonetheless always worth […]

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Archive Nota Bene Steven Wedgeworth

Some First Things Love For Calvin

Since we often criticize First Things for a sort of faux ecumenism, it’s only fair that we point out when they engage in the real thing. James Rogers points out what is obvious to anyone who has ever read Calvin, predestination is not that big of an issue for him. Oh sure, he believes in it and […]

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Archive Nota Bene Steven Wedgeworth

Reza Aslan’s Explanation

Two weeks ago we noticed that Reza Aslan’s scholarship seemed to be about 20 years out of date. He was simply recycling claims made by Bart Ehrman and the Jesus Seminar with seemingly no knowledge of the numerous scholarly rebuttals that have come out over the past decades. As it turns out, there’s a perfectly […]

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Archive Nota Bene Steven Wedgeworth

Calvinist or Lutheran?

Dr. David Koyzis asked an interesting question at First Things as to why Baptists use the modifier “Calvinist” but not “Lutheran.” This is in line with the standard discomfort which Reformed theologians always have towards Baptists who appropriate the terms “Reformed” or “Calvinistic.” Dr. Collin Garbarino, himself a Calvinistic Baptist, offered up a mostly helpful reply. […]

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Archive Nota Bene Steven Wedgeworth

Carl Trueman and Tragic Worship

Dr. Trueman takes on the entertainment idol among those churches committed to contemporary worship. He makes a solid point when he writes: The problem with much Christian worship in the contemporary world, Catholic and Protestant alike, is not that it is too entertaining but that it is not entertaining enough. Worship characterized by upbeat rock music, […]

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Archive Nota Bene Steven Wedgeworth

Joe Carter, Front Porch Republic, and the Problem of Utopia

Way back in late 2011 and early 2012 Joe Carter posted some helpful, interesting, and entertaining reflections on the Front Porch Republic. His main point is that, however intellectually stimulating their work may be, they cannot seem to escape a fundamental commitment to utopianism. This is a problem that is hardly limited to the good […]

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Andrew Fulford Archive Civic Polity Economics Nota Bene

First Things First: No Trespassing

John Médaille writes in a Facebook comment: First Things is conservative in the abstract but liberal in application. The quintessential First Things view is an article they ran title[d] “Waiting for St. V[la]dimir” (as in Vladimir Lenin), which was an ignorant and gratuitous attack on Alasdair MacIntyre. The author’s objection was th[at] MacIntyre attacked capitalism, which […]

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Archive Nota Bene Steven Wedgeworth

Alan Jacobs, Lena Dunham, and Jane Austen

Alan Jacobs has a very fine article in First Things where he contrasts the amoral world presented in the HBO television series Girls with the moral themes and critiques in the literature of Jane Austen. He compellingly shows how Miss Austen weaves a realistic moral message throughout her writings, falling into neither romanticism nor naivete. All in all, […]

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Archive Natural Law Peter Escalante Philosophy

Helping David Bentley Hart Find His Nature

David Bentley Hart has responded somewhat coyly to Dr Feser here. Dr Feser had pointed out the peculiarly Humean tone of Hart’s remarks about natural law, which suggested that there is no bridge from the is to the ought; of course Hart is not actually a Humean, but more a Romantic, which means, one who allows […]