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Archive Ecclesiastical Polity Reformed Irenicism Steven Wedgeworth

The Leadership of the Catholic Church: Now vs. Then (Pt. 2)

In a previous post, we discussed what the Roman Catholic Church claims about the founding of the church and the implications of that founding upon the identity and leadership of the church. It is important to pay attention to the details of the claim. Rome does not merely state that churches must have bishops, nor […]

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Archive Book Reviews Nota Bene Reformed Irenicism Steven Wedgeworth

A Reformation Reader from the Davenant Institute

Since everyone knows that Martin Luther caused the modern capitalist order, we thought we’d lean right into that bad boy and use today’s date to unveil the Davenant Institute’s latest publishing endeavor! Behold, we present to you Reformation Theology: A Reader of Primary Sources with Introductions. Get your copy here. This thing is pretty sweet. Basically, […]

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Archive Nota Bene Reformed Irenicism Simon Kennedy

Retrieval and the Use of History

The question of “Why history?” and “Why the look to the past?” is one historians constantly have to answer. There have been many answers given. Cary J. Nederman offers a good one in his Lineages of European Political Thought. In the introductory chapter Nederman discusses the utility and importance of investigating medieval political ideas, writing: Indeed, the […]

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Archive Philosophy Reformed Irenicism Simon Kennedy

What We Mean by Renewal and Retrieval

One of the aims of the The Calvinist International is the ‘renewal of Christian wisdom’ to re-invigorate the Church. The method for this renewal is a principled retrieval of classical Protestant Christianity. The retrieval is not a bigoted one, which pushes aside ideas and sources not directly stemming from magisterial Reformation. Far from it. The […]

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Archive Ecclesiastical Polity Nota Bene Steven Wedgeworth

“High Church” Always Becomes Invisible Church

Dominic Foo has a very good essay on the way “high church” ecclesiologies always fall back into a sort of “invisible church” theology when forced to reckon with the actual historical record. Here’s a sample: The point is that in the end nobody, at least nobody with a proper command of church history, believes that […]

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Archive E.J. Hutchinson Nota Bene Reformed Irenicism

Hus’ 600th Anniversary

6 July is an important date in Christian history; this year it marks not only the 480th anniversary of the execution of Thomas More, but also the 600th anniversary of the martyrdom of the Bohemian Jan Hus. A while back, on the anniversary of the death of John Calvin, I posted an excerpt from Theodore […]

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Archive Nota Bene Steven Wedgeworth

Davenant Latin Institute

The Davenant Latin Institute has now publicly launched, the initial response has been very encouraging. So far we have over 40 students enrolled, and we expect that number to grow. This has been particularly exciting in light of the fact that nearly all of the promotion has been online and online “word of mouth.” This […]

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Archive Joseph Minich Reformed Irenicism Sacred Doctrine

And “What is Reformed Catholicism?”

Following up on Pastor Wedgeworth’s post regarding “Reformed Irenicism,” I thought it important to explain a few points regarding the relationship of this term to the idea of “Reformed Catholicism,” as it is often called. As it turns out, different people mean very different things by the label – though I think they (broadly speaking) could […]

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Archive Nota Bene Steven Wedgeworth

Luther’s Personality: Fearsome or Fun?

Church history and hagiography are not always so easy to distinguish. We paint certain pictures of personalities with little or no solid evidence, but rather base them on sentiments formed much later (sometimes even sentiments we form internally). An obvious case in point is the way in which Martin Luther is typically thought of as […]

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Archive Nota Bene Steven Wedgeworth

Farewell to One of the Greats

Prof. Edmund S. Morgan  has passed away at the rich age of 97. The New York Times describes his work: Like his mentor and fellow atheist, the Harvard historian Perry Miller, Professor Morgan found his richest material in the religious thought of Puritan New England and endless fascination in the theological debates and spiritual struggles […]