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Archive Civic Polity Ecclesiastical Polity Philosophy Reformed Irenicism Sacred Doctrine Steven Wedgeworth

Evangelical Resourcement

The editors of TCI have been working on a project of Protestant and Reformed Resourcement for some time.  We have named this project, “How Then Have We Lived?,” in tribute to the late Francis Schaeffer.  He energized the Evangelical world to move forward confidently with a Christian philosophy and engagement with the world of arts […]

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Archive Book Reviews Peter Escalante Philosophy

The Unintended Concession: Carl Trueman’s Response to THE UNINTENDED REFORMATION

We had it in mind to review Brad Gregory’s The Unintended Reformation, but Carl Trueman has already done an excellent job of it here. This was preceded by a post where he considers in a more technical fashion the history of the ideas in metaphysics, namely analogy and univocity of being, which Dr Gregory seems […]

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Archive Civic Polity Ecclesiastical Polity Sacred Doctrine Steven Wedgeworth

Littlejohn’s Reviews of Richard Hooker

Brad Littlejohn has been consistently working in Richard Hooker studies for some while now.  He has a soon-to-be published essay on Richard Hooker’s doctrine of the two kingdoms and its relation to modern and incorrect articulations of the doctrine today.  We have critiqued these mistaken presentations elsewhere, and now Mr. Littlejohn has offered another critique of […]

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Archive Civic Polity Ecclesiastical Polity Steven Wedgeworth

Hooker and Shakespeare

Douglas Wilson has written an imaginative article on the “real Shakespeare” (see pgs 6-19).  Adopting the Oxfordian theory of Shakespearian authorship, and particularly that of Mark Anderson, Wilson advances the claim that Shakespeare was a Puritan by examining relationships between Edward de Vere and the Martin Marprelate tracts.  Wilson sees a similar satirical wit in “Shakespeare” and Marprelate, […]

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Archive Civic Polity Peter Escalante

Africa, Church, and State

To assume that the only way Africa can be saved is through nation-state modalities, and that the church can only contribute to this process by helping nation-state politics is ridiculous, especially in Africa, where the church has far more credibility than the corrupt nation-state institution. Thus writes Emmanuel Katongole, in The Sacrifice of Africa: A […]

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Archive Book Reviews Philosophy Steven Wedgeworth

The Humanism of Martin Luther

William J. Wright, Martin Luther’s Understanding of God’s Two Kingdoms: A Response to the Challenge of Skepticism, Baker Academic 2010. William J. Wright seeks to explain Martin Luther’s theology of the “two kingdoms,” not as merely one locus among many in Luther’s thought, but rather as a controlling method by which Luther approaches all intellectual questions, […]

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Archive Book Reviews Peter Escalante

The Art of Dying

Rob Moll, “Our culture doesn’t know what to think about death”, writes Pastor Rob Moll at the very beginning of his book, and he is including in this charge many modern Christians. And so long as we don’t know what to think about it, we can’t know what to do with it. But the Christian […]

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Archive Peter Escalante Sacred Doctrine

Irenicism, Truth, and Method

Our first essay, as Mr. Wedgeworth explains at its beginning, is a deeper and more thoroughgoing examination of a controversial claim we addressed in outline in a previous essay kindly published by Credenda Agenda. There, we were concerned to outline, for pastors especially, the intellectual and pastoral background of some recent critiques of the Reformed tradition. […]

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Archive Reformed Irenicism Sacred Doctrine Steven Wedgeworth

A Compound Person and Complex Questions (Part 2)

This is a continuation of the paper which was begun here.  It resumes the argument by investigating the Reformed Scholastics’ use of the expression and concept “compound person.”

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Archive Early Church Fathers Reformed Irenicism Sacred Doctrine Steven Wedgeworth

A Compound Person and Complex Questions (Part 1): Addendum to “Do We Have a Christology Crisis?”

Peter Escalante and I wrote our previous paper[1] as a historically and academically informed, yet primarily pastoral reflection on the current state of Christology in theological apologetics. It was our contention that the historical and theological discussion is most often a red herring, with the true issue being anxiety regarding ecclesiastical identity and improper catechesis. And this […]