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Archive Civic Polity Philosophy Steven Wedgeworth

Our Faith Informs Us in Everything We Do

The New Yorker’s Adam Gopnik is a thoughtful and entertaining writer, frequently offering intelligent, searching, and even helpful essays. It is precisely because of this that we were so disappointed by his latest piece on what scares him about religiously-informed politics. In it, Mr. Gopnik gives his view of secularism, American history, and the primacy of science, […]

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Archive Civic Polity Peter Escalante

Hart-ers Gonna Hart

Yet more murmurings from Fogey Life, despite the question having long since been settled. Why exactly Darryl Hart feels compelled to flail at a straw-man version of Christendom is at this point a mystery known only to God. But it’s worth making a few points by way of reply, for the sake of those who […]

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Archive Civic Polity Peter Escalante Steven Wedgeworth

Foundations of Salafism

Professor Brian J. Auten has posted a very helpful explanation of Salafi Islam, as well as its peculiar jihadist manifestation. Towards the end, he even gives a “translation” guide, offering loose Christian analogues for Salafi principles to aid the reader. One ought to sharply distinguish between traditional Islam and extremist Salafism, but Dr. Auten’s map is […]

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Archive Philosophy Sacred Doctrine Steven Wedgeworth

God Reads Greek

The danger of so many outlines of biblical theology offered to us today is that they suggest that Old and New Testaments may be used indifferently to illustrate one and the same level of God’s dealing with man, and they assume that the language in which this dealing is expressed is essentially Hebrew even where […]

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Archive Civic Polity W. Bradford Littlejohn

Cornelis Venema and the Two Kingdoms

A long-awaited volume of essays contesting the recent Reformed two-kingdoms doctrine is at last on its way to the press: Kingdoms Apart, edited by Ryan McIlhenny (forthcoming from P&R Publishing, Oct. 25, 2012). McIlhenny, an erstwhile ally of David VanDrunen in some respects, turned critic when the full scope of his project was made clear […]

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Archive Book Reviews Steven Wedgeworth

Bad Religion: How We Became a Nation of Heretics

Ross Douthat, Bad Religion: How We Became a Nation of Heretics, Free Press, 2012. Ross Douthat’s Bad Religion: How We Became a Nation of Heretics is a very encouraging read. It gives the reader a detailed narrative of the fall of mainline Christianity in America, as well as the various reactions to this fall, along […]

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Archive Book Reviews Steven Wedgeworth

Between Babel and Beast: America and Empires in Biblical Perspective

Peter J. Leithart, Between Babel and Beast: America and Empires in Biblical Perspective, Cascade Books, 2012. Peter J. Leithart’s Between Babel and Beast: America and Empires in Biblical Perspective is an explosion in a book. A scholarly feat, with each chapter boasting between 40 and 100 endnotes, some of which are miniature essays in themselves,[1] it […]

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Archive Civic Polity Steven Wedgeworth

The Original Obama

Jefferson was inaugurated the third president of the United States on March 4, 1801, following one of the most bitterly contested presidential elections in American history.  His religion, or the alleged lack thereof, emerged as a critical issue in the campaign.  The Federalists vilified him as an unreformed Jacobin, libertine, and atheist.  The campaign rhetoric […]

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Archive Book Reviews Steven Wedgeworth

The Escondido Theology: A Reformed Response to Two Kingdom Theology

John Frame, The Escondido Theology: A Reformed Response to Two Kingdom Theology, Whitefield Media Publishing, 2011. “What’s that one about?” asked the stranger sitting next to me at the local coffee shop. I had no idea where to start, because it’s a very hard question to answer. The same question might just as well be […]

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Archive Civic Polity W. Bradford Littlejohn

Two Kingdoms Redivivus: Is there still a fuss?

This past spring, I wrote a piece for this site engaging Matthew Tuininga’s essay, “The Two Kingdoms and the Reformed Tradition,” which had been published in several online venues. Mr. Tuininga is a former student of David VanDrunen, and it was my contention that despite certain helpful qualifications, Tuininga’s version of the Reformed two-kingdoms doctrine […]