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Archive Authors E.J. Hutchinson Nota Bene Reformed Irenicism

The Legacy of Protestant Education

A little over a year ago, on the occasion of the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation, I commented in a short piece on the salutary effect that event had on education. The general historical picture is clear enough without detailed statistical analysis; but statistical evidence can help to contribute to a thicker, more complete […]

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Archive Authors Civic Polity E.J. Hutchinson Nota Bene Philosophy Reformed Irenicism The Two Kingdoms

Melanchthon’s Aristotle: Civic Virtue

Philip Melanchthon is nothing if not consistent in the way in which he handles the appropriation of classical, and particularly Aristotelian, thinking about virtue for the benefit of Christians (a topic treated recently at Mere Orthodoxy). Melanchthon finds Aristotle (or an eclectically ressourced Aristotle) of special use for political purposes, provided that his insistence be granted that […]

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Archive Reformed Irenicism Steven Wedgeworth

“That the Ministry of the Gospel and the Schools be Maintained”: The Academies of Protestantism

This paper was originally delivered as a lecture to All Saints Church in Lancaster Pennsylvania on Feb. 18, 2017 as a part of a conference on church history and education. The audio from the entire conference is available here.   Like all catechisms, the Heidelberg Catechism has a section dedicated to expounding the Ten Commandments. […]

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Archive Authors E.J. Hutchinson Nota Bene Reformed Irenicism

Do You Believe in Magic?

Talk of the supposed “disenchantment” of the world of “modernity” continues apace, providing (as it has always done) a cottage industry for academics and connoisseurs of Angst–and little else. I thought it might be useful to have a quick look at the history of the word, and what it means–or, at least, what it has […]

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Archive Authors E.J. Hutchinson Nota Bene Reformed Irenicism

“The Year of Our Lord 1943” (1)

I’m reading Alan Jacobs’ recent book The Year of Our Lord 1943: Christian Humanism in an Age of Crisis. I’m more persuaded by some aspects of it, less so by others, and stimulated by all. I likely will not have time to write up a full review, which would in any case probably be longer than […]

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Archive Steven Wedgeworth

What Should Christians Think About Halloween?

I grew up with a very normal American view of Halloween. It was a day where I dressed up like cartoon characters or cartoonish or campy monsters in order to have a few laughs and get some candy. There really was no weighty “significance” behind it. It was just good clean fun. As I got […]

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Archive Authors E.J. Hutchinson Nota Bene Reformed Irenicism

John Adams’ Reply to Rush

In response to yesterday’s post on Benjamin Rush, a colleague in History, Matt Gaetano, points to more on this issue among early Americans as recorded in Ellis Sandoz’s book Republicanism, Religion, and the Soul of America. Today we’ll look at one brief episode in the drama. John Adams, a frequent correspondent of Rush, wrote Rush a letter […]

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Archive E.J. Hutchinson Philosophy Reformed Irenicism

Obviously Protestants Ruin Poetry

The folks over at Sententiae Antiquae recently posted a passage worth reading from a letter of Benjamin Rush to Ashbel Green from 1807. Therein Rush says: No more Latin should be learned in these schools than is necessary to translate that language into English, and no more Greek than is necessary to read the Greek Testament. […]

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Archive Ecclesiastical Polity Mark Jones Reformed Irenicism Sacred Doctrine

The Mode and Meaning of Baptism

Christians have not agreed on the proper mode of baptism. Many believe that the only proper way to baptize someone is by the full submersion of the body under water. They typically argue that baptizo means immerse and they also appeal to Romans 6 as a watertight (pardon the pun) argument proving the need for […]

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Archive Early Church Fathers Ecclesiastical Polity Reformed Irenicism Sacred Doctrine Steven Wedgeworth

The Leadership of the Catholic Church: Now vs. Then (Pt. 6)

It’s time to bring our series on the identity and government of the church to a conclusion. You can find the previous installments here: Part 1: The Crisis of Rome and Its Claims of Ultimate Authority Part 2: Church Origins and Officers in the New Testament  Part 3: Bishop-Elders and Bishops in the Late First […]